Educational Theatre in the Time of COVID-19

ArtsPraxis Volume 7, Issue 2 cover image

ArtsPraxis Volume 7, Issue 2
ISSN: 1552-5236

ArtsPraxis Volume 7, Issue 2 looks to engage members of the global Educational Theatre community in dialogue around current research and practice. This call for papers is released in concert with the publication of ArtsPraxis Volume 7, Issue 1 and upon the launch of the new ArtsPraxis homepage. The submission deadline for Volume 7, Issue 2 is July 15, 2020.

Submissions should fall under the category of Educational Theatre in the Time of COVID-19

Call for Papers:

Papers should be no longer than 4,000 words, must be accompanied by a 200 word abstract and 100 word biographies for the author(s), and conform to APA style manual. For this issue, articles can include traditional academic scholarship and narratives of practice.

Educational Theatre in the Time of COVID-19

From the time government agencies and the press reported the emergence of a novel corona virus in late 2019, there has been a fundamental shift in the way we congregate, communicate, and educate across the world. Artists and educators have been called upon to reinvent their practice seemingly overnight. While we struggle to balance our personal health and wellness, our community contributions remain as vital as ever. In tribute to this reinvention, ArtsPraxis invites you to share your scholarship, practice, and praxis. As we’ve asked before, we welcome teachers, drama therapists, applied theatre practitioners, theatre-makers, performance artists, and scholars to offer vocabularies, ideas, strategies, practices, measures, and outcomes.

Article submissions should address one of the following questions:

• How and why do we teach drama and theatre through distance learning?
• How do teaching artists navigate residencies in a virtual space?
• What is the role of drama education during a pandemic?
• How do we prepare future theatre artists and educators when fieldwork is disrupted?
• What are innovative ways of devising original works and/or teaching theatre using various aesthetic forms, media, and/or technology?
• How can integrated-arts curricula facilitate teaching, learning and presenting the craft of theatre in an online environment?
• How do we assess students’ aesthetic understanding and awareness online?
• How can drama provide a forum to explore ideas online?
• What are innovative strategies for using drama to stimulate dialogue, interaction and change at this time?
• How is theatre being used to rehabilitate people in prisons, health facilities, and elsewhere when social distancing is mandated and a health crisis is evolving in these spaces?
• What ethical questions should the artist/educator consider in online work?
• How is theatre for young audiences innovating in the digital space?
• Theatre for Young Audiences has always been in the forefront of theatrical innovation. So how can social distancing be achieved while presenting work for young audiences?
• How do we define and measure success in theatre for young audiences in the digital space?

We encourage article submissions from interdisciplinary artists, educators, and scholars engaged in work associated with these topics. Our goals are to motivate a dialogue among a wide variety of practitioners and researchers that will enrich the development of educational theatre in the coming years.

Dr. Jonathan P. Jones, New York University
Editor

Editorial Board:

• Selina Busby, The Royal Central School of Speech and Drama, UK
• Amy Cordileone, New York University, USA
• Ashley Hamilton, University of Denver, USA
• Norifumi Hida, Toho Gakuen College of Drama and Music, Japan
• Kelly Freebody, The University of Sydney, Australia
• Byoung-joo Kim, Seoul National University of Education, South Korea
• David Montgomery, New York University, USA
• Ross Prior, University of Wolverhampton, UK
• Daphnie Sicre, Loyola Marymount University, USA
• James Webb, Bronx Community College, USA
• Gustave Weltsek, Indiana University Bloomington, USA

Reviewing Procedures:

Each article will be sent to two peer reviewers. They will provide advice on the following:

• Whether the article should be published with no revisions/with revisions.
• The contribution the article makes to the arts community.
• Specific recommendations to the author about improving the article.
• Other publishing outlets if the article is considered unacceptable.

Papers should be sent to:
Dr. Jonathan P. Jones
ArtsPraxis
Include ‘ArtsPraxis Submission’ in the subject line.

ArtsPraxis Volume 6 Issue 2

Cover image from a 2018 NYU Steinhardt, Program in Drama Therapy production of "Living with...", written in collaboration with four long term survivors of HIV and three newly diagnosed adults based on months of group therapy sessions.

ArtsPraxis – Volume 6, Issue 2 engages members of the global Educational Theatre community in dialogue around current research and practice on theatre and heath.

The first collection of articles highlight reflective practice. Lawrence Ashford explores interactions between professional performers and young people in Australian hospitals. Bianca C. Frazer looks at the deconstruction of stereotypes about diabetes on stage. James Webb reflects on the personal impact of writing, acting, and sharing his autobiographical play, The Contract, detailing his struggles as a gay man in the Black Church in the United States. Faith Busika and Zandile Mqwathi discuss drama processes employed to address mental health and promote wellbeing in South Africa. Finally, Yi-Chen Wuunpacks her experience collaborating with a woman with cerebral palsy and the woman’s performance of her autobiographical memory.

The second section features a pair of critically reflective articles with recommendations for practitioners and researchers. Alyssa Digges advocates for a mental health and wellness curriculum for students in actor training programs. Teresa A. Fisheranalyzes failures in a theatre for health project, specifically looking at the facilitator’s role in such a project.

The final pair of articles look to examine existing practice and repertoire. William Pinchin connects Jung’s collective unconscious theory and Lecoq’s understanding of a universal poetic sense, reevaluating the neutral mask. Finally, Majeed Mohammed Midhin and Samer Abid Rasheed Farhan interrogate the healing power of theatre through a discussion of contemporary prison theatre praxis and the representations made in Wertenbaker’s Our Country’s Good.

This issue of ArtsPraxi is available for download.

Access individual articles here:

Editorial: On Mindfulness by Jonathan P. Jones

The Flexible Performer in Applied Theatre: In-hospital Interaction with Captain Starlight by Lawrence Ashford

“Where’s Your Imagination?”: Using the Social Model to Deconstruct Stereotypes about Diabetes on Stage by Bianca C. Frazer

A Critical Autobiography: Examining the Impact of a Theatre-Making Process on a Theatre Practitioner’s Identity Development by James Webb

Addressing Mental Health in South Africa Using the Djembe Drum and Storytelling to Open up the Dialogue of Finding, Owning, and Using Your Voice in the Home as a Christian Woman by Faith Busika and Zandile Mqwathi

Towards an Approach of Performise: I Am a Normal Person (2018) as a Case Study by Yi-Chen Wu

Preventing Actor Burnout through a Mental Health and Wellness Curriculum by Alyssa Digges

Bad Facilitation or the Wrong Approach?: Unpacking the Failure of a Theatre for Health Project by Teresa A. Fisher

The Shadow of the Neutral Mask: A Jungian Examination of Lecoq-based Neutral Mask Praxis by William Pinchin

The Healing Power of Theatre in Timberlake Wertenbaker’s Our Country’s Good by Majeed Mohammed Midhin and Samer Abid Rasheed Farhan

CfP: ArtsPraxis Volume 7 Issue 1

ArtsPraxis Volume 7, Issue 1 looks to engage members of the global Educational Theatre community in dialogue around current research and practice. This call for papers is released in anticipation of the publication of ArtsPraxis Volume 6, Issue 2. The submission deadline for Volume 7, Issue 1 is November 15, 2019.

Submissions should fall under one of the following categories:

  • Drama in Education (i.e., studies in drama/theatre curriculum, special education, integrated arts, assessment and evaluation)
  • Applied Theatre (i.e., studies in community-based theatre, theatre of the oppressed, the teaching artist, diversity and inclusion)
  • Theatre for Young Audiences and Play Production (i.e., studies in acting, directing, dramaturgy, playwriting, dramatic literature, theatre technology, arts-based research methodologies)

Call for Papers

Papers should be no longer than 4,000 words, must be accompanied by a 200 word abstract and 100 word biographies for the author(s), and conform to APA style manual. 

Key questions the Issue will address include:

Drama in Education

  • How and why do we teach drama and theatre in schools and community settings?
  • How do the roles and responsibilities of the teaching artist differ from those of the classroom teacher (primary, secondary or higher education)?
  • What is the contemporary role of drama and theatre in arts education?
  • How do we prepare future theatre artists and educators in the 21st century?
  • What are innovative ways of devising original works and/or teaching theatre using various aesthetic forms, media, and/or technology?
  • To what extent can the study of global theatre forms impact students’ learning?
  • To what extent should we distinguish theatre-making from drama as a learning medium?
  • How can integrated-arts curricula facilitate teaching, learning and presenting the craft of theatre?
  • How do we assess students’ aesthetic understanding and awareness?
  • What research supports the potential of drama as a learning medium?
  • How do drama and theatre make connections across curricular content areas and beyond schools?
  • How do drama and theatre education contribute to lifelong learning?
  • What role do drama and theatre play in community agencies?

Applied Theatre

  • How can drama provide a forum to explore ideas?
  • What are innovative strategies for using drama to stimulate dialogue, interaction and change?
  • How is theatre being used to rehabilitate people in prisons, health facilities, and elsewhere?
  • How do we prepare future artists/educators for work in applied theatre?
  • What ethical questions should the artist/educator consider in their work?
  • In what ways are aesthetics important in applied theatre? How do we negotiate a commitment to both the process and product of applied theatre work?
  • How do artist/educators assess participants’ understandings in an applied theatre project?
  • What are the major tensions in the field and how are these being addressed?
  • To what extent has recent research on affect influenced community-based praxis?

Theatre for Young Audiences/Play Production

  • Theatre for young audiences is an international movement and the borders are breaking down so how do we present and respond to work from other countries?
  • Who exactly are our new audiences– who are we talking to?
  • Are we as brave as we think we are? How does what we think we should do relate to what we want to do as artists?
  • Is the writer at the heart of future theatre creation? What has happened to dramaturgy in the brave new world of immersive, experiential, visual/physical theatre?
  • Theatre for Young Audiences has always been in the forefront of theatrical innovation. So what is next?
  • What have we learned about nurturing the artist of the future– playwriting, theatre-making, performance?
  • How do artists establish rigorous, intentional new works development processes that are innovative and sustainable?
  • How does accountability serve the stakeholders in a new works development process?
  • How do we define and measure success in theatre for young audiences?

We encourage article submissions from interdisciplinary artists, educators, and scholars engaged in work associated with the forum topics. Our goals are to motivate a dialogue among a wide variety of practitioners and researchers that will enrich the development of educational theatre in the coming years.

Dr. Jonathan P. Jones, New York University
Editor

Editorial Board:

  • Selina Busby, The Royal Central School of Speech and Drama, UK
  • Amy Cordileone, New York University, USA
  • Ashley Hamilton, University of Denver, USA
  • Norifumi Hida, Toho Gakuen College of Drama and Music, Japan
  • Kelly Freebody, The University of Sydney, Australia
  • Byoung-joo Kim, Seoul National University of Education, South Korea
  • David Montgomery, New York University, USA
  • Ross Prior, University of Wolverhampton, UK
  • Daphnie Sicre, Loyola Marymount University, USA
  • James Webb, Bronx Community College, USA
  • Gustave Weltsek, Indiana University Bloomington, USA

Reviewing Procedures

Each article will be sent to two peer reviewers. They will provide advice on the following:

  • Whether the article should be published with no revisions/with revisions.
  • The contribution the article makes to the arts community.
  • Specific recommendations to the author about improving the article.
  • Other publishing outlets if the article is considered unacceptable.

Papers should be sent to:

Dr. Jonathan P. Jones
ArtsPraxis
Include ‘ArtsPraxis Submission’ in the subject line.

ArtsPraxis Volume 5 Issue 1

Cover Photo: Photo by Saskia Kahn from Of a Certain Age, NYU Steinhardt, Program in Educational Theatre, Directed by Joe Salvatore, 2018

This invited special issue of ArtsPraxis features voices from that two-day forum and offers just a small snapshot of the varied perspectives and practices that gathered together at NYU. I was keenly interested in sharing the powerful and resonant comments of established leaders in the field alongside new and emerging artists and scholars whose work covers new ground either in form or content.

The issue begins with an excerpted version of the forum’s opening keynote conversation with Dr. Patricia Leavy, best-selling author, book series creator and editor, and internationally recognized leader in arts-based and qualitative research, in which she discusses her origins and evolution as an artist and scholar and shares her thoughts on the aesthetics and ethics of ethnodrama and arts-based research. This is followed by the text of a keynote delivered by leading scholar in ethnodrama and ethnotheatre Emeritus Professor Johnny Saldaña, in which he situates our practice as theatre makers within the complex world at large, shares examples of plays from across the genre that illustrate this “art of fabrication,” and makes recommendations for how we move forward as artists and scholars in a post-truth era. Emerging scholar and drama therapist Darci Burch introduces the term “ethno-actor” and defines the aesthetic and ethical implications for an actor who performs the speech and gestural patterns of an actual person.

The issue then includes three ethnodramatic scripts, each of which takes a different approach to the form and content of the genre. Thomas Murray’s The Right of Way examines the circumstances surrounding the death of a cyclist in Chicago while simultaneously offering historical contextualization of transportation in the United States, highlighting the growing tensions between cyclists, automobile drivers, and pedestrians. Jamila Humphrie and Emily Schorr Lesnick explore how young members of the lgbtq+ community choose to express and explain their identities with their interview theatre play, How We GLOW, which has been performed over 30 times in venues throughout the United States and Ireland. And the special issue rounds out with My Other Job by Cali Moore and Rachel Tuggle Whorton, their humorous and insightful homage to the actor’s “survival” vocation, and how that plays out across a variety of experiences and contexts.

– Joe Salvatore, Guest Editor

This issue of ArtsPraxis is available for download.

Editorial by Joe Salvatore

A Plenary Conversation: Patricia Leavy with Joe Salvatore

Keynote Address: The Art of Fabrication by Johnny Saldaña

The Ethno-Actor: Encompassing the Intricacies and Challenges of Character Creation in Ethnotheatre by Darci Burch

The Right of Way by Thomas Murray

How We GLOW by Jamila Humphrie and Emily Schorr Lesnick

My Other Job by Cali Elizabeth Moore and Rachel Tuggle Whorton

ArtsPraxis Volume 6 Issue 1 has been published.

ArtsPraxis Volume 6, Issue 1 cover

ArtsPraxis – Volume 6, Issue 1

ArtsPraxis – Jones: Editorial – A New Colossus

Our contributions in this issue come from artists, educators, and activists—all working towards bringing light to dark places. We begin with two theoretical frameworks from different parts of the world; one at the start of her scholarly work and the other following a solid career of contributions to the field. Xiaojin Niu explores the interaction between theatre and modern power with an examination of sexuality study. Roger Woosterrevisits an old question at a new time: whether we should draw a distinction between theatre-making and drama as a learning medium.

As applied theatre practitioners continue to engage in theatre practices with diverse populations, we have three contributions interrogating powerful topics. Jennifer Wong looks at the importance of being an outsider, pondering the strengths that come from this positionality; Sarah Woodland looks to aesthetics, navigating an approach to support incarcerated participants in truth-telling; and Julie Rada gains a deeper understanding of a familiar drama strategy, asking participants to witness each other while in prison.

The final sequence of articles takes a close look at how theatre educates. Rivka Rocchio recounts her time using drama to teach English in Samoa, revealing ways in which drama can level the playing field between insider and outsider. Mark Branner and Mike Poblete document successful iterations of theatre for babies and outline a list of characteristics for this emerging field. Manjima Chatterjee defines material theatre as an aesthetic experience that promotes democracy in the performance space. Finally, Jennifer Essex wrestles with two categories of audience participation in children’s interactive dance theatre: ‘interactors’ and ‘non-interactors,’ defining and problematizing each.

Download Full PDF of ArtsPraxis Volume 6, Issue 1

Contents

Volume 6 Issue 1 April 2019

Editorial: A New Colossus by Jonathan P. Jones

The Interaction between Theatre and Modern Power with an Examination of Sexuality Study in Schooling by Xiaojin Niu

Exercising the Mind by Roger Wooster

Importance of the Outsider: Reflections from the Facilitator of a Community-Based Playbuilding Project by Jennifer Wong

Aesthetics of Truth-Telling: Intercultural Applied Theatre Praxis in an Australian Women’s Prison by Sarah Woodland

Being There…in Prison by Julie A. Rada

Breaking the Cultural Hierarchy: Using Drama to Teach English in Samoa by Rivka Rocchio

Getting Serious about Playful Play: Identifying Characteristics of Successful Theatre for Very Young Audiences by Mark Branner and Mike Poblete

Drama for Democracy: Material Theatre by Manjima Chatterjee

Co-operative Make-Believe as Practice in Children’s Interactive Dance Theatre by Jennifer Essex

ArtsPraxis, Volume 5 Issue 2

The cover image for Arts Praxis Volume 5 Issue 2, 2019, is from a keynote presentation in which the words "all theatre is political" were crossed out - in an attempt to provoke conversation, which is the shared aim of this issue.

ArtsPraxis Volume 5 Issue 2 has been published.

Last April, at the 15th annual Forum: Performance as Activism, I was heartened to meet practitioners, artists, educators and scholars from around the globe who were enthusiastically engaged in using the art form of theatre to address pressing social and cultural issues. This edition of ArtsPraxis includes fourteen inspiring and pertinent articles that report on activist theories and practices that have been initiated, explored and successfully implemented in communities and classrooms.

At the Forum, we asked, “How is activism defined or redefined in 2018?” Through panel discussions, workshops, performances and paper presentations we explored how activism can disrupt, subvert and transform dominant social and political narratives. More than sixty presenters from twelve different countries relayed inspirational and revelatory methods towards the goal of promoting enduring social change through aesthetic expression. In this global space of open dialogue and exchange, we, as activists learned about organizational methods, pedagogical tools, aesthetic devices that, in responding to the complexities of our time, push past boundaries and binaries to redefine cultural innovation.

I hope that you will be inspired by the following theories and practices offered in this volume, ranging from the metamodern to dialogical activism to personal resilience, and surrounded by artistic innovation.

This issue of ArtsPraxis is available for download.

Contents

Volume 5 Issue 2  March 2019

Editorial by Nancy Smithner

FORUM HIGHLIGHTS

NYU Keynote, 2018 by Ping Chong

Deaf Talent: Richness within Our Stories by James W. Guido

Ximonïk: The Unbound Performances of Maya Women’s Group Ajchowen by Chelsea Hackett

IDENTITY

Hope with Dirty Hands: Community Theatre Participation as Activism in Everything is Possible by Bridget Foreman

Energize, Resist, Re-Purpose: An American Theatre Responds by Penelope Cole

From the School to the Educating Community: Practices of Social Theatre in Italy as a New Form of Activism by Giulia Innocenti Malini

YOUTH

Leaping into the Disassociated Space: Unknowing Activism, Agency and Youth Identity in “Notes From Nowhere” by Gustave Weltsek and Clare Hammoor; Illustrator: Kylie Walls

Students as Arts Activists: Insights and Analysis from a Politically Engaged Assessment by Matthew Reason

Inciting Solidarity through Plural Performativity and Pedagogical Aesthetics in Ethnodrama with Marginalized Youth in Toronto by Rachel Rhoades

PROTEST

Beyond the Wall: Borderland Identity through Puppets by Ana Diaz Barriga

The Aesthetics of Activism in Korea: The Utopian Performative and Communitas by Jisun Kim

A Silent Shout: Metamodern Forms of Activism in Contemporary Performance by Tom Drayton

RESILIENCE

“It Did Get Rid of the ‘These People Are Old People’ Thing in My Brain”: Challenging the Otherness of Old Age through One-to-One Performance by Bridie Moore

Inday Dolls: Body Monologues and Lullabies for Freedom in Prison: Scripting Possible Futures in Justice Art in Iloilo’s Correctional System by Ma Rosalie Abeto Zerrudo and Dennis D. Gupa

Media Practice and Theatre in Conversation: Co-Creating Narratives for Positive Social Change by Jackie Kauli and Verena Thomas

Announcing ArtsPraxis Volume 4 Issue 1

Logo for Arts Praxis, Volume 4, Issue 1, 2017

ArtsPraxis Volume 4 Issue  1 has been published.

In the Applied Theatre section, Kay Hepplewhite investigates the applied theatre artist’s praxis, attending closely to their responsivity to participants. John Somers identifies the unique features of community theatre in the UK and the role it plays in fostering community cohesion. Linden Wilkinson documents her experience developing an ethnodrama about efforts to create a memorial for the Australian Aboriginal massacre at Myall Creek focusing on trauma and reconciliation. Finally, Kaitlin O. K. Jaskolski chronicles her experience utilizing applied theatre practices to teach life skills to adolescents and young adults in Lagos, Nigeria.

In the Drama in Education section, Scott Welsh reflects on his experiences teaching monologue workshops and interrogates the relationship between education and theatre.

In the Theatre for Young Audiences section, Jessica M. Kaufman unpacks dramaturgy-as-research, specifically looking at her work in devised theatre for young audiences. Dennis Eluyefa provides a brief overview of children’s theatre in the UK, navigating both the educative and entertainment values of the work.

In the final section on Youth Theatre, Clare Hammoor employs auto-ethnography to investigate what he calls, “the production of meaning and the possibilities of children’s theatre.” Pamela Baer illuminates a myriad of ways in which youth can engage in a participatory aesthetic. And finally, Sean Mays looks at the many challenges of adapting Broadway musicals for young performers.

LOOKING AHEAD

During the next few months, we will invite Joe Salvatore, Chair of the 2017 NYU Forum on Ethnodrama, to serve as guest editor, looking to identify highlights of the diverse offerings at the Forum for inclusion in a special edition of ArtsPraxis (Volume 5 Number 1). Following that issue, we will again engage members of the Educational Theatre field who may or may not have been present at the Forum yet want to contribute to the ongoing dialogue around our three areas of specialization: applied theatre, drama in education, and theatre for young audiences. The call for papers will be released concurrently with the next issue (November 2017) and the submission deadline is February 1, 2018.

ArtsPraxis Volume 4, Issue 1

ISSN: 1552-5236

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Dr. Jonathan P. Jones, New York University
Editor, ArtsPraxis

Editorial Board:

Amy Cordileone, New York University, USA
Norifumi Hida, Toho Gakuen College of Drama and Music, Japan
Byoung-joo Kim, Seoul National University of Education, South Korea
Ross Prior, University of Wolverhampton, UK
Nisha Sajnani, New York University, USA
Daphnie Sicre, Borough of Manhattan Community College, USA
Prudence Wales, Hong Kong Academy for Performing Arts, Hong Kong
James Webb, Bronx Community College, USA

ArtsPraxis, Volume 3

ArtsPraxis Volume 3 Issue 1 cover image and logo

ArtsPraxis Volume 3 has been published.

It is with great enthusiasm that I present this third volume of ArtsPraxis. In 2003, I worked as a research assistant for Philip Taylor cataloging the extant journals in the arts, arts education, and arts therapies disciplines in order to demonstrate the need for the first volume of this publication. To find myself now as Editor is both humbling and gratifying, given the time and attention that I have contributed to this journal over the years.

This volume features a number of articles that were presented in some form at the Forum on Educational Theatre in April 2016, for which I served as manager. The Forum celebrated the 50th anniversary of the Program in Educational Theatre at New York University: building on the past and looking towards the future. The event was a fine testament to the legacy of the Program’s founders, Lowell and Nancy Swortzell who began the Program in 1966. All told, with presenters, performers, staff, volunteers, and delegates, the participant pool exceeded 400 individuals, demonstrating the strength of the field and a commitment from colleagues the world over to come to New York, share their work, and celebrate this milestone.

Following the Forum, I asked the presenters to consider sharing their articles with a wider audience through publication in this journal. I hoped that we would get a range of material covering the scope of the Forum which was meant to mirror the three areas of specialization that the Program focuses on: Drama in Education, Applied Theatre, and Theatre for Young Audiences and Play Production. The articles that follow do indeed represent that range, but also, the authors represent the diverse range of practitioners and researchers in the field.

The first article grew out of one of the plenary experiences at the Forum which comprised a three-day lunch time podcast recording session, each of the three on a separate topic. The first podcast was about mentoring, a topic so central to the experience of established practitioners and researchers in the field, and the relationships they develop with subsequent generations. The experiences shared by Juliana Saxton, Carole Miller, and Monica Prendergast seemed so universal, that I jumped up as the recording came to an end asking them to consider writing up their discussion as an article for this issue.

In the Drama in Education section, Roger Wooster begins by questioning the current state of Theatre in Education (TIE) which was once so central to the field though it has seemingly taken less prominence in recent years. Wooster questions what the future holds for the methodology while making an impassioned plea to keep it alive. James Mirrione provides a reflective piece detailing his female Muslim students’ experiences as they study The Taming of the Shrew. Kate’s reversal in the play is controversial to many contemporary students looking at the play through a feminist lens, but how do Mirrione’s students feel about it and to what degree does the reversal resonate with their lived experience?

In the Applied Theatre section, Ross Prior investigates a selection of graduate and post-graduate applied theatre programs in service of identifying themes from the represented coursework. Trent Norman and Rebecca Brown Adelman (two of four recipients of the 2016 Swortzell Innovator Awards at the Forum) partner with Ligia Batista Silverman to detail some of their innovative approach to facilitating applied theatre work in Colorado. Thereafter, Anne Smith explores her arts-integration work with Creative English, an applied theatre program focused on supporting English language development for adult refugees and migrants in the UK.

In the final section on Theatre for Young Audiences and Play Production, Sonya Baehr recounts the experience of devising an original theatre piece with her high school students in Brooklyn which subsequently traveled to the Edinburgh Fringe Festival. In the last article, Jim DeVivo surveys young playwrights programs in the United States, providing both a historical overview as well as documentation of currently active programs.

Download Full PDF of ArtsPraxis Volume 3, Issue 1