Third Annual Jim Hinojosa Distinguished Alumni Award Winner Announced

Photo of Gary Bedell.

We are pleased to announce the recipient of the third annual Jim Hinojosa Alumni Award, Dr. Gary Bedell. The award, named in honor of the late Dr. Jim Hinojosa’s immense impact on the NYU Steinhardt Department of Occupational Therapy and the entire OT field, recognizes outstanding NYU OT alumni making significant contributions to the profession.

Dr. Bedell is a two-time alumnus of the department, having earned his post-professional master’s degree at NYU in 1986 and his PhD in 1998. He is currently chair of Tufts University’s Department of Occupational Therapy and has dedicated his career to informing the development of interventions, programs, and policies designed to promote meaningful participation of children and youth with disabilities in real-life contexts.

He has authored or co-authored numerous widely-used tools for measuring and promoting participation, including the Child and Adolescent Scale of Participation (CASP), the Participation and Environment Measure for Children and Youth (PEM-CY), and Social Participation and Navigation (SPAN).

Read on for a Q&A with Dr. Bedell exploring his research, advice for future OTs, and what it was like to work with Dr. Hinojosa.

What inspired you to pursue the occupational therapy profession?

I always knew that I wanted to do something to help other people. I had experienced mental health issues in my high school years, but I was able to overcome them with the support of friends, family, and therapy. I knew I wanted to work with youth with mental health challenges, but I didn’t think that pursuing traditional talk therapy was “me.” Learning from my own experiences, I did some research and discovered the link between OT interventions and mental health. Although my interests ultimately changed as I went on in my field work, one of the nice things about OT is that there are often many available opportunities to explore during your career.

How do you think your education at NYU Steinhardt prepared you to become a leader in the field?

When I was a student, NYU was very pluralistic in terms of research design and purpose — I was able to take many research design courses which served me well in terms of my ability to conduct mixed-methods research in my career. It was emphasized that you have to know how to use the research methods that will best fit your research questions. My experience was also unique because I was an adjunct associate professor at NYU. I was teaching and getting other types of interdisciplinary research and educational opportunities that taught me to be a leader. All of my research and scholarship is interdisciplinary, and I attribute this to the opportunities made available to me at NYU.

You have worked extensively to develop measures and interventions to benefit those with traumatic and other acquired brain injuries. Can you tell us more?

I was awarded a postdoctoral research fellowship at Boston University that focused on children and youth with traumatic and other acquired brain injuries. When I say acquired brain injury, I mean acquired after birth — for example, strokes, brain tumors, seizure disorders, or brain infections. During this period, the international World Health Organization’s International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health (ICF) was being developed, so a lot of relevant concepts were being discussed, particularly the concept of participation. Very generally, participation means involvement in life situations.

One of my first projects was to develop a survey to follow up with families on their children and adolescent youth discharged from inpatient rehabilitation. The survey included areas that weren’t necessarily being looked at, like their social environment, physical environment, attitudinal environment, and participation. The survey included measures that could be used on their own, such as the Child and Adolescent Scale of Participation (CASP), that is used with other populations and has been translated into multiple languages for use in many countries worldwide. Often one opportunity leads to another, so subsequently I was asked to participate in the development of additional participation measures (PEM-CY) and an app-based coaching intervention to promote social participation among teenagers with traumatic brain injuries called SPAN.

What do you consider your most significant accomplishment in the field?

My measurement and intervention work have had the most world-wide impact, but I feel like my most significant accomplishment was my outreach work and research related to HIV that I conducted during my time at NYU. The outreach focused on the needs of children and families affected by HIV/AIDS, and the research focused on how people with HIV/AIDS, particularly gay men, managed their daily lives and developed strategies based on the experience of living with their symptoms. There was a lot of stigma at the time and people were afraid to work with people with HIV. A lot of the time this fear comes from not knowing, so I think it’s a significant accomplishment that my work helped to raise awareness.

What was it like to work alongside Jim Hinojosa?

Jim really was my first true mentor in my career — I’m indebted to him. He allowed me to be me, had a great sense of humor, was very generous with his time, and offered me so many opportunities! He asked me to be part of a lot of interdisciplinary research collaborations with other faculty and saw something in me that gave me the confidence to be a part of those teams. He also encouraged me to enroll in NYU’s PhD program, encouraged me to publish early on before my PhD, and helped my research dissemination efforts, which exposed me to other local and national and opportunities.

What advice do you have for OTs beginning their careers?

It will all come together! It is important to be your authentic self and continue to develop knowledge and skills — a lifelong process — and seek out opportunities because it’s usually those opportunities that lead to other opportunities. There are so many options within the OT field. The key is to find a place where you feel valued and supported that does work that is important to you and those you serve.

Inclusion and the Abu Dhabi Special Olympics: A Conversation with Kristie Koenig and Janet Njelesani

Photo of Janet Njelesani and Kristie Koenig. Photo courtesy of Amy Kang.

Janet Njelesani (left) and Kristie Koenig (right). Photo courtesy of Amy Kang.

Kristie Koenig, chair of NYU Steinhardt’s Department of Occupational Therapy, and Janet Njelesani, an assistant professor in the department, recently spoke with The Gazelle about inclusion in the context of the Special Olympics World Games currently taking place in Abu Dhabi.

“Hopefully, through the Special Olympics and other national efforts that support inclusion, people living in the United Arab Emirates will get more chances to interact and build relationships with People of Determination,” Koenig said.

The two professors recently taught a J-Term course at NYU Abu Dhabi exploring the topic of inclusion both inside and outside the UAE.

“Our class was actually composed of 17 people from 17 different countries, and so each student was able to bring a unique perspective about their countries’ policies related to inclusion and people with disabilities,” Njelesani added.

Read the full Q&A with Koenig and Njelesani here.

Congratulations to 2019’s Frieda J. Behlen Scholarship Winners

Photo of award recipients sitting on steps in Washington Square Park.

Jillian Yoo (left) and Michelle Conley (right) are this year’s recipients of the Frieda J. Behlen Occupational Therapy Scholarship.

The NYU Steinhardt Department of Occupational Therapy is pleased to announce that Jillian Yoo and Michelle Conley are this year’s recipients of the Frieda J. Behlen Occupational Therapy Scholarship. The award recognizes high-achieving students with a demonstrated commitment to contributing to the NYU OT community.

Congratulations to Jillian and Michelle!

Jillian Yoo is passionate about exploring the impact of spiritual engagement on health outcomes. After witnessing the resilience of communities that had previously faced significant trauma while attending the Occupational Therapy Department’s “Global Context” course in Tel Aviv, Israel, Jillian hopes to illuminate how spiritual practices can affect individuals’ routines, self-concepts, and overall well-being. She also participated in Steinhardt’s ASD Nest Program, working alongside educators from the United Arab Emirates and NYU faculty to explore the implications of inclusion for teachers and therapists. Jillian will graduate in 2021 and looks forward to helping individuals heal, recover, and regain their independence by providing compassionate occupational therapy services.

Michelle Conley came to NYU Steinhardt’s MS in Occupational Therapy program with a goal of using her past experience working as a communications professional to promote occupational therapy through advocacy and interdisciplinary collaboration. After attending a workshop on constructing homemade toys for children with disabilities, Michelle developed an interest in creating appealing accessible technologies. She now aspires to be a part of a research team that creates functional yet fashionable clothing and assistive devices for children and adults with disabilities. Michelle will graduate in 2020 and hopes to join an outpatient clinic where she can work with a multidisciplinary team on a range of complex cases.

The Frieda J. Behlen Occupational Therapy Scholarship is an endowed fund created principally by gifts from alumni of NYU’s occupational therapy programs. Income generated by the endowment is awarded annually to second-year Professional Program students who demonstrate superior academic achievement as well as financial need.

The fund was named to honor the memory of Frieda J. Behlen, founder and longtime chair of NYU’s Department of Occupational Therapy. Ms. Behlen was known for her generosity, often opening her own pocketbook to enable deserving students to complete their studies.

The award takes the form of a tuition aid applied toward summer courses. With growth in the fund’s balance from new gifts, the amount distributed continues to increase annually.

Visit this site to contribute to the scholarship and other Department of Occupational Therapy funds.

The Human Anatomy Lecture and Lab Experience

In the distance: graduate occupational therapy students collaborating on a dissection assignment during Human Anatomy lab.

Human Anatomy, a lecture and lab course, is a hands-on learning experience that teaches graduate occupational therapy students about the skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems through interactions with human cadavers.

Taught by Offiong Aqua, MD, who holds a joint appointment as a clinical associate professor in NYU Steinhardt’s departments of Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy, and Communicative Sciences and Disorders, Human Anatomy is a “rite of passage” for occupational therapy students.

Why is this a critical course for future OTs?

“You obviously cannot study health care without understanding the structures and working of the human body. It would be like a mechanic having no clue about cars and working on them anyway,” Aqua says.

Read the full article here.

Photo courtesy of Debra Weinstein.

 

Faculty Achievements: Grants and Publications Summer/Fall 2018

Patricia Gentile

  • James, M.K., Robitsek, J.R., Syed, M.S., Gentile, P.A., Ramos, M., Perez, F. (2018). Clinical and non-clinical factors that predict discharge disposition after a fall. Injury 49(5) pp. 975-982. doi: 10.1016/j.injury.2018.02.014

Anita Perr

  • NYU Dental School Clinic Redesign to Improve Access and Services for Children and Adults with Disabilities.

Tsu-Hsin Howe

  • Book chapter published: Howe, T.-H. (2018). Oromotor Therapy. In J. Ongkasuwan & E. C. Chiou (Eds), Pediatric Dysphagia: Challenges and Controversies. New York, NY: Springer.     

Yael Goverover

  • Chiaravalloti, N. D., Goverover, Y., Costa, S. L., & DeLuca, J. (Accepted 7/30/2018). A Pilot Study Examining Speed of Processing Training (SPT) to Improve Processing Speed in persons with Multiple Sclerosis. Frontiers in Neurology (Manuscript ID: 389748).  
  • Stern, B., & Goverover, Y. (First Published June 3, 2018). An occupational perspective of everyday technology use for men with multiple sclerosis. The British Journal of Occupational Therapy. https://doi.org/10.1177/0308022618777985
  • Akbar, N., Sandroff, B., Wylie, G., Strober, L.B., Smith, A., Goverover, Y., Motl, R.W., DeLuca, J., & Genova, H. Progressive resistance exercise training and changes in resting-state functional connectivity of the caudate in persons with multiple sclerosis and severe fatigue: A proof-of-concept study. Neuropsychological Rehabilitation. (Accepted Feb 28, 2018, in press). doi: 10.1080/09602011.2018.1449758. PMID: 29618280
  • Stern, B. Z., Strober, L., DeLuca, J., & Goverover, Y. (2018). Subjective well-being differs with age in multiple sclerosis: A brief report. Rehabilitation Psychology, 63(3), 474-478. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/rep0000220 PMID: 30113202
  • Goverover, Y., & DeLuca, J. (2018). Assessing everyday life functional activity using actual reality in persons with MS. Rehabilitation Psychology. 63(2), 276-285. doi: 10.1037/rep0000212. PubMed PMID: 29878832.
  • Goverover, Y., Sandroff, B., & DeLuca, J. (2018). Dual-task of fine motor skill and problem-solving in   individuals with multiple sclerosis: A pilot study.  Archives of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation. 99(4):635-640. doi: 10.1016/j.apmr.2017.10.012. PMID: 29108966
  • Goverover Y., Chiaravalloti, N., O’Brien, A., & DeLuca, J. (2018). Evidenced based cognitive rehabilitation for persons with multiple sclerosis: An updated review of the literature from 2007-2016. Archives of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, 99(2), 390-407. doi: 10.1016/j.apmr.2017.07.021. PMID:28958607
  • Costa, S. L., DeLuca, J., Sandroff, B. M., Goverover, Y., & Chiaravalloti, N. D. (2018). The role of demographic and clinical factors in cognitive functioning of persons with relapsing-remitting and progressive multiple sclerosis. Journal of International Neuropsychology Society, 24(2), 139-146. doi: 10.1017/S1355617717000777. PMID: 28830576
  • Kalina, J., Hinojosa, J., Strober, L., Bacon, J., Donnelly, S., & Goverover, Y. (2018). A randomized controlled trial to improve self-efficacy in persons with Multiple Sclerosis: The Community Reintegration for Socially Isolated Patients (CRISP) program. American Journal of Occupational Therapy. 72, 7205205030p1-

Janet Njelesani

  • Njelesani J., Siegel, J., & Ullrich, E.  (2018). Realization of the rights of persons with disabilities in Rwanda. PLOS One, 13(5), e0196347. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0196347
  • Njelesani J., & Njelesani, D. (2018). Addressing HIV/AIDS in school in Zambia through traditional games. AIDS Care, 1-3. doi: 10.1080/09540121.2018.1476660
  • Njelesani J., Hashemi, G., Cameron, C., Cameron, D., Richard, D., & Parnes, P. (2018). From the day they are born: A qualitative study exploring violence against children with disabilities in West Africa. BMC Public Health, 18(1), 153. doi: 10.1186/s12889-018-5057-x
  • Dean L., Mulamba, C.,  Njelesani J., Mbabazi, P. & Bates I. (2018). Establishing an international laboratory network for neglected tropical diseases: Understanding existing capacity in five WHO regions. F1000Research, 7, 1464. doi: 10.12688/f1000research.16196.1
  • Co-Applicant: Advancing inclusion of children with disabilities in the UAE. NYU Abu Dhabi Institute. $15,000.
  • Principal Investigator: Generating and preventing violence: Schools’ responses to school violence against students with disabilities in Zambia.National Academy of Education (NAEd)/ Spencer Postdoctoral Fellowship. $70,000.

Kristie Patten Koenig

  • Patten Koenig, K. (in press). A strength based frame of reference for autistic individuals. In P. Kramer, J. Hinojosa & T. Howe (Eds.). Frames of reference for pediatric occupational therapy (4th edition).
  • Patten Koenig, K. & Shore, S. (2018). Self-determination and a shift to a strengths based model. In R. Watling & S. Spitzer (Eds.), Autism: A    Comprehensive Occupational Therapy Approach, 4th edition, Bethesda, MD: AOTA Press.
Ongoing Awards:
  • Co-Principal Investigator: “IDEAS: Inventing, Designing and Engineering on the Autism Spectrum”. (Principal Investigator Wendy Martin, PhD). National Science Foundation (NSF#1614436). Funded for 9/16 to 8/19. $300,734 subaward of $1,193,170 total award.
  • Principal Investigator: “NYU ASD Nest Support Project.” NYC Department of Education.  7/1/18-6/30/19. $1,600,000
New Awards:
  • Principal Investigator: “ASD Nest supports, consultation, and professional development.” Norwalk Public School District. 3/1/18 – 6/30/19. $120,059
  • Principal Investigator: “Ghanaian Institute for the Future of Teaching and Education (GIFTED) Women’s Fellowship Program- Phase III”. (Co-Investigator Rose Vukovic, Ph.D.). Banco Santander.  Funded for 1/19 to 12/21. $418,000

Class Notes Summer/Fall 2018

Patricia West (MA, 2000) is currently living in Southern California. She obtained her specialty certification from AOTA in feeding, eating, and swallowing about 2 years ago, with focus on the pediatric population.

Valerie Grinman (MS, 2017) has been working at MedStar National Rehabilitation Hospital since March 2017, primarily in acute stroke rehab. She recently became a Certified Brain Injury Specialist and is also part of a hospital-wide interdisciplinary team called the Safety Coach Program, helping to prevent workplace injuries in patients and staff.

Diane Dirette (MA ’93, PhD ’97) and Sharon Gutman (PhD ’98) are the new co-editors of the 8th edition of Occupational Therapy for Physical Dysfunction formally edited by Catherine Trombly and Mary Radomski. The new edition is scheduled to be published in 2020.

Michelle Rosenberg (MS, 2013) recently opened up a private practice in Ontario, Canada called “OT for Wellness”. She helps educate fellow occupational therapy practitioners in holistic approaches to practice, including comprehensive Yoga Instructor Certification Courses for OTs. She can be reached at MLR5085@gmail.com.

Marlene Handler, MS, OTR/L (MS, 2016) currently works in a D75 high school called the Brooklyn Transition Center, where the curriculum is designed with a focus toward basic vocational training in areas such as cooking, printing, and gardening, as well as community service. Marlene loves to integrate mindfulness and wellness strategies into her personal practice with her students to help them navigate everyday stressors.

Rick Frank (MA, 1988) has been doing OT for over 10 years part time in an outpatient rehab clinic, as part of a chronic pain management program. As part of that, he is excited to be doing some therapy sessions in a warm water pool, as well as teaching an aquatic yoga class. For the past two years he has been organizing and teaching an adaptive yoga class for people with disabilities.

Kelly Scanlon (MS, 2016) is currently a hand therapist who moved from NYC to Chicago in Jan 2018. She now works at Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush (Ranked 4th in US Orthopaedics). Kelly and her hand therapy colleagues will be hosting a CUE opportunity along side top ranked hand surgeons in the Nov 2018 Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush Elbow to Hand Symposium: Hand to Elbow Fractures, a Case-Based Approach to Problem Solving A 1-½ day course reviewing anatomy, surgical interventions, and treatment for fractures of the elbow, wrist, and hand.

Robbie Levy (MA, 1982) is excited to share that her business Dynamic Kids, where she is Founder and Executive Director, is celebrating it’s 20th anniversary working with the children and their families in Westchester County. NY. In addition, Robbie was presented with Westchester Magazine’s 2018 Small Business Award in a ceremony at the Crowne Plaza in White Plains on September 13, 2018.

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What’s the Most Important Part About Being an OT? OTD Student Shanteria Carr Shares Her Answer

Meet Shanteria Carr, one of our Doctor of Occupational Therapy (OTD) students who has chosen to study in one of our newest technology-enhanced learning programs. Read on to learn about Shanteria’s path to becoming an Occupational Therapist, and what made her choose NYU Steinhardt to further her education.

What is your background and what made you decide you become an OT?

I currently reside in Washington, DC where I work as a Pediatric Occupational Therapist for the District of Columbia Public Schools. In undergrad at the University of Florida, I took a course called “Introduction to Health Professions”, where weekly, a different health professional gave a lecture to the class. It was through this course that I learned about the field of occupational therapy and the benefits the profession can provide individuals.

I began volunteering with a certified hand therapist at Shands Healthcare in Gainesville, FL. I was originally a psychology major in undergrad, however that quickly changed after a semester of volunteering with the occupational therapist. I was captivated by the interventions that were used to rehabilitate individuals to help them engage in activities after injuries. What I loved about the field was the various settings I could potentially work in, and also that I could work with individuals across the lifespan.

Although I had decided to no longer major in psychology, I was intrigued by the role psychology played within the field of occupational therapy when providing intervention to individuals. The experience from volunteering lead me to pursue a rewarding career in occupational therapy that I am forever grateful for.

What made you interested in the online OTD program at NYU Steinhardt?

I was interested in NYU Steinhardt’s online OTD program because of the flexibility the program offers. I have the ability to complete assignments around my work schedule and also select specialization courses based on my clinical areas of interest of in pediatrics and leadership. Being able to select courses based around my interests was important to me because it will allow me to further develop my skills as a clinical.

An additional advantage for me was the live classes offered through the program. I was excited about the opportunity to engage with professors and other doctoral candidates in real time because I did not want my learning to be limited through only online discussion posts or reading material.

What do you think is the most important thing OT’s do, or the most important aspect of the profession? 

As occupational therapists, our most important role is being able to collaborate with clients and their families to gather information about our clients psychological, emotional well-being and physical needs and developed intervention plans to help our clients engage in meaningful activities. Through participation in meaningful activities our clients are able to improve their quality of life and live satisfying lives. Helping clients participate in meaningful activities after they experience an injury, illness or disability is the core and the most important aspect of our profession.

NYU OT at the International Congress of the World Federation of Occupational Therapists

The 17th International Congress of the World Federation of Occupational Therapists (WFOT) took place May 21-25, 2018 in Cape Town, South Africa. The theme of this year’s Congress was “Connected in diversity: positioned for impact.”  The Congress’ program showcased the passion for occupational therapy that is shared around the world.

New York University was fortunate to be one of six OT programs from the United States to have an exhibition booth at the Congress.  The response to the OT booth was great!  Prospective post-professional students had the opportunity to speak with faculty and staff about the online and on-campus Post-Professional OT programs at NYU. We are also happy to report that a number of NYU and NYU affiliated individuals gave well received poster and oral presentations.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Presentation Oral Sessions

Mariana D’Amico (Alumni)

  • Perspectives and Recommendations: Occupational Therapy and Transgender Populations

 

Rita Fleming-Castaldy (Alumni)

  • An historical analysis of occupational therapy and social activism: From settlement houses to reductionism to disability rights and occupational justice. Subtitle: Lessons learned from the profession’s first century to inform our future, enable well-being, and influence social policy

 

Siaw Chui Chai (Alumni)

  • Basics of innovation in health sciences; An overview of a new multidisciplinary course

 

Szu-Wei Chen (PhD Student)

  • Reconsidering the importance of leisure occupation in OT practice: Leisure should be an end goal of intervention

 

Kristie Patten Koenig (Chair/Faculty) and Stephen Shore (Adjunct Faculty)

  • Reframing Autism: Authentic Partnerships with Autistic Self Advocates to Guide Research, Teaching and Service Delivery

 

Chang Dae Lee

  • A Study on Validity and Reliability of Upper Extremity Performance Test for Elderly (TEMPA)

 

Anita Perr (Faculty)

  • The ConnectAbility Challenge: Design Challenge for Digital Tech

 

Presentations Poster Sessions

Rita Fleming-Castaldy (Alumni)

  • Connected in Justice: Harnessing Local Resources to Confront Social and Occupational Injustice, Empower Marginalized People, and Enable Health and Well-being Subtitle: Afya: An International Occupational Therapy Case Study in Making a Global Impact

 

Siaw Chui Chai (Alumni)

  • Grip Strength, Pinch Strength, and Manual Dexterity among Older Adults Living in Elderly Residential Care Facilities: Dominant Hand Vs Non-Dominant Hand

 

Grace Kim (Faculty)

  • An Innovative, Interdisciplinary, and Client-Centered Approach to Improve Clothing Accessibility for Individuals with Disabilities
  • Does Adherence to Instructions Affect Upper Extremity Motor Outcomes in Individuals with Stroke Using Robotics Training? 

 

Kristie Patten Koenig (Chair/Faculty) and Stephen Shore (Adjunct Faculty)

  • Reframing Autism: Authentic Partnerships with Autistic Self Advocates to Guide Research, Teaching and Service Delivery

 

Paula McCreedy (Alumni/ Former Faculty)

  • Using Storytelling in Occupational Therapy to Help Children Overcome Learning Differences and Regulatory Challenges

 

Janet Njelesani (Faculty)

  • Realization of the rights of persons with disabilities in Rwanda

 

Anita Perr (Faculty) and Kay Koch

  • Hands-on Mat Assessment and Documentation for Seating and Wheeled Mobility
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NYU OT at the 2018 AOTA Conference

NYU OT Students at AOTA Conference

This year NYU Steinhardt Department of Occupational Therapy students, faculty, and staff headed to Salt Lake City, Utah April 19-22 for the annual American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) conference.

The theme for last year’s conference focused on the History of OT during its 100-year celebration, and this year’s conference focused on the future of the OT profession. In support of this year’s theme, AOTA Vice President Shawn Phipps led a session entitled, “Vision 2025.” During this session, participants learned ways the OT community can work together to position the profession for continued growth in the upcoming years.

Faculty at the NYU OT Booth

For the fourth year in a row, NYU Steinhardt OT had a booth in the Expo. Alumni and current students stopped by to say hello, reconnect with the department, and show their NYU OT pride by wearing our popular NYU OT Alumni, Supporter, and Students badges.

The booth also provided an opportunity for prospective students to learn more about the post-professional MA, OTD, and PhD programs, as well as the new online OTD program. Faculty members and staff were on hand to answer questions about the curriculum, admissions requirements, and our remuneration program.

NYU OT Students and Faculty Gathered at AOTA Conference

One of the highlights: Our very own Alison Rangel-Padilla (Fieldwork Coordinator) led a Salsa Dance Break! This well-attended and fun event had conference participants dropping their bags and moving their bodies to salsa, merengue, and samba music on the conference floor.

 

 

 

 


NYU Steinhardt OT Faculty, Staff, and Student Participation:

 

Kristie Patten Koenig, Associate Professor

-Short Course 122 – Senses & Sensibilities: Experiencing, Recognizing, and Providing Support for Sensory Issues from Autistic and Practitioner Viewpoint (With Stephen Shore Ed.D., Adelphi University)

Plenary: Autistic Individuals as Equal Partners in Occupational Therapy Research

 

Yael Goverover. Associate Professor

-Research 2009 – My Way of Staying Connected”?: The Lived Experience of Adults With Multiple Sclerosis as Everyday Technology Users

-Abstract Synopsis: This constructivist grounded theory study examined the lived experience of adults with multiple sclerosis as everyday technology users. Technology is experienced as a means of fostering reciprocal connections to self and others within a context of connection to the world.

Contributing Authors: Batsheva Becher; Ilana Goss; Stephanie Tufano; Yael Goverover, PhD, OTR/L

-Short Course 405 – Everyday technology for all? Limitations and opportunities in assessment and treatment for adults with neurological disorders. Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation. With additional speakers Brocha Z. Stern, MOT, OTR/L, CHT, New York University; Joan Toglia, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, Mercy College

Tsu-Hsin Howe:

-CY 3009 – Life Beyond School: Developing a Functional Life Skills Intervention To Promote School-to-Work Transition for Students With Developmental Disabilities with speakers Chia-Yang Chiang, M.A., OTR/L, New York City Department of Education

-Research 1027 – Effectiveness of Self-Determination Programs in Promoting Secondary Transition for Young Adults With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities with speaker Chia-Yang Chiang, M.A., OTR/L, New York City Department of Education

-Research 4012 – Parental Feeding Practice and Perceptions of Feeding Issues of Their Children With History of Prematurity in the First 2 Years of Life

 

Patricia Gentile:

-RDP 1001 – Occupational Therapy in the Perioperative Surgical Home, Part of Poster Session #1 Rehabilitation, Disability, & Participation

 

Tracy Chippendale:
-Research 3012 – Knowledge, Behavioral Practices, and Experiences of Outdoor Fallers: Considerations for Prevention Programs

 

Allison Rangel, Fieldwork Coordinator:

-Institute 025 – (AOTA) Becoming an Academic Fieldwork Coordinator, with additional speakers Jamie Geraci, MS, OTR/L, Stony Brook University; Jeanette Koski, OTD, OTR/L, AFWC, The University of Utah; Jaynee Meyer, OTD, OTR/L, University of Southern California

 

Students:

Sandra Duarte
-GP 8006 – Cultural Competence in Occupational Therapy: Putting Cultural Sensitivity To WorkWith additional speaker Brigitte Desport

Chia-Yang Chiang, M.A., OTR/L, New York City Department of Education
CY 3009 – Life Beyond School: Developing a Functional Life Skills Intervention To Promote School-to-Work Transition for Students With Developmental Disabilities with Tsu-Hsin Howe
-Research 1027 – Effectiveness of Self-Determination Programs in Promoting Secondary Transition for Young Adults With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities with Tsu-Hsin Howe

Margaret Waskiewicz:
-RDP 2006 – Back to Basics: Enhancing Our Practice Through a Return to Occupation
Part of Poster Session with Kellianne Arnella and Nandita Singh, MPH, OTR/L; and
Steve Vanlew
-RDP 7015 – Tying It All Together: Mindfulness-Based Interventions for People With Parkinson’s Disease

Brocha Stern

-Short Course 405 – Everyday technology for all? Limitations and opportunities in assessment and treatment for adults with neurological disorders with Yael Goverover; Joan Toglia
-Short Course 245 – (SIS) RDSIS Hand Subsection Annual Program – Health Promotion and Self-Management Support in Hand Therapy – Bridging Chronic and Acute Care with additonal speaker Brian Connors
-RDP 3001 – So You Want To Be a Hand Therapist? Strategies for Authentic Specialization
-Research 2009 – My Way of Staying Connected”?: The Lived Experience of Adults With Multiple Sclerosis as Everyday Technology Users with additional speakers Samantha Gelon and Kathryn Ross
-Short Course 412 – Update on Upper-Extremity Cumulative Trauma Disorders: Physiological, Psychosocial, and Ecological Perspectives

Chang Dae Lee
-Research 5002 – Korean Upper-Extremity Performance Test for the Elderly: Validity and Reliability
-Research 8003 – Korean Upper-Extremity Performance Test for the Elderly: Normative Data and Characteristics of Upper-Extremity Function of Adults and Elderly

Monica Puglisi, MS, OTR/L, New York City Department of Education
-CY 3001 – Common Core Writing Standards and Alignment With Typical Childhood Development in Elementary School: A Scoping Review with Kristie Koenig, additional Speaker